13 November 2013

NGC 891


NGC 891 in LRGB

NGC 891 (also known as Caldwell 23) is an edge-on unbarred spiral galaxy (actually barred) about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It was discovered by William Herschel on October 6, 1784. The galaxy is a member of the NGC 1023 group of galaxies in the Local Supercluster. It has an H II nucleus.
The object is visible in small to moderate size telescopes as a faint elongated smear of light with a dust lane visible in larger apertures.
In 1999, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged NGC 891 in infrared.
In 2005, due to its attractiveness and scientific interest, NGC 891 was selected to be the first light image of the Large Binocular Telescope. In 2012, it was again used as a first light image of the Discovery Channel Telescope with the Large Monolithic Imager.
Supernova SN 1986J was discovered on August 21, 1986 at apparent magnitude 14.

09 October 2013

NGC 7380 in LHaRGB

The Wizard Nebula (Sh 2-142)

NGC 7380 (also known as the Wizard Nebula) is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. William Herschel included his sister's discovery in his catalog, and labelled it H VIII.77. It is also known as 142 in the 1959 Sharpless catalog (Sh2-142). This reasonably large nebula is located in Cepheus.

30 September 2013

Sh 2-155 Cave Nebula

C9 Cave nebula

-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 with F/T focuser 3025 & Starizona usb motor focus
-Mount: Skywatcher ΗEQ5 pro
-Chip: Atik 314L+ at 0c
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 with Meade DSI I pro
-Filter wheel: Starlight Xpress usb 7x1.25
-Location: Salamina (08.2013)(Ha) & Loutsa,Evia (LRGB)
-Luminance: 18x420sec 1x1bin
-Red: 10x300sec 1x1bin
-Green: 10x300sec 1x1bin
-Blue: 10x360sec 1x1bin
-Ha Astrodon 5nm :26x600sec
-Total: 546 minutes
-Programs I have used-
Maxim DL ,Pixinsight 1.6, Photoshop CS5, The Sky6 ,Focusmax

The Cave Nebula, Sh2-155 or Caldwell 9, is a dim and very diffuse bright nebula within a larger nebula complex containing emission, reflection, and dark nebulosity. It is located in the constellation Cepheus.
Visually it is a difficult object, but with adequate exposure, makes a striking image. The nebula gets its name from the dark lane at the eastern side abutting the brightest curve of emission nebulosity which gives the appearance of a deep cave when seen through a telescope visually.

25 September 2013

M 33 The Triangulum Galaxy


M 33 in LRGB


 Luminance : 70 minutes
Red,Green and Blue : 40 minutes each
Total time : 190 minutes

The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598, and is sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy, a nickname it shares with Messier 101. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy and about 30 other smaller galaxies. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye

28 July 2013

M 16 Eagle nebula in HaRGB



Pillars of Creation close up


-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 mod with FT 3025
-Camera: Qhy 2pro mono
-Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 pro
-Ts finder 8x50 & Meade DSI 1 for guiding
-Location: Mountain Parnon-Pelloponisos,GR


Information about M 16

The Eagle Nebula (catalogued as Messier 16 or M16, and as NGC 6611, and also known as the Star Queen Nebula) is a young open cluster of stars in the constellation Serpens, discovered by Jean-Philippe de Cheseaux in 1745-46. Its name derives from its shape that is thought to resemble an eagle. It contains several active star-forming gas and dust regions, including the famous "Pillars of Creation", photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Eagle Nebula is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 7000 light-years distant. The tower of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula is approximately 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers high.

The brightest star in the nebula (HD 168076) has an apparent magnitude of +8.24, easily visible with good binoculars. It's actually a binary star formed of an O3.5V star plus an O7.5V companion.

The cluster associated with the nebula has approximately 460 stars, the brightest of spectral class O, a mass of roughly 80 solar masses, and a luminosity up to 1 million times that of the Sun. Its age has been estimated to be 1–2 million years.

The descriptive names reflect impressions of the shape of the central pillar rising from the southeast into the central luminous area. The name "Star Queen Nebula" was introduced by Robert Burnham, Jr., reflecting his characterization of the central pillar as the Star Queen shown in silhouette.

"Pillars of Creation" region

Images made by Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen using the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995 greatly improved scientific understanding of processes inside the nebula. One of these photographs became famous as the "Pillars of Creation", depicting a large region of star formation. The small dark areas in the photograph are believed to be protostars. The pillar structure of the region resembles that of a much larger star formation region in the Soul Nebula of Cassiopeia, imaged with the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2005[6] and characterized as "Pillars of Star Creation".[7] or "Pillars of Star Formation".[8] These columns – which resemble stalagmites protruding from the floor of a cavern – are composed of interstellar hydrogen gas and dust, which act as incubators for new stars. Inside the columns and on their surface astronomers have found knots or globules of denser gas, called EGGs ("Evaporating Gaseous Globules"). Stars are being formed inside some of these EGGs.

X-ray images from the Chandra observatory compared with Hubble's "Pillars" image have shown that X-ray sources (from young stars) do not coincide with the pillars, but instead randomly dot the area.[9] Any protostars in the pillars' EGGs are not yet hot enough to emit X-rays.[citation needed]

Evidence from the Spitzer Telescope suggests that the pillars in M16 may already have been destroyed by a supernova explosion. Hot gas observed by Spitzer in 2007 suggests that the area was disturbed by a supernova that exploded some 8000 to 9000 years ago. Due to the distance of the nebula, the light from the supernova would have reached Earth between 1000 and 2000 years ago. The more slowly moving shock wave from the supernova would have taken a few thousand years to move through the nebula, and would blow away the delicate pillars – but the light showing us the destruction will not reach the Earth for another millennium.

19 July 2013

NGC 6992 Eastern Veil in LHaRGB


  • Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 mod with FT 3025
  • Camera: Qhy 2pro mono
  • Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 pro
  • Ts finder 8x50 & Meade DSI 1 for guiding
  • Location: Agios Panteleimon & Grammatiko-Attiki



Information about NGC 6992
 
The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103), a large but relatively faint supernova remnant. The source supernova exploded some 5,000 to 8,000 years ago, and the remnants have since expanded to cover an area roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, or 36 times the area, of the full moon). The distance to the nebula is not precisely known, but Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) data supports a distance of about 1,470 light-years.

The Hubble Space Telescope captured several images of the nebula. The analysis of the emissions from the nebula indicate the presence of oxygen, sulfur, and hydrogen. This is also one of the largest, brightest features in the x-ray sky.

The nebula was discovered on 1784 September 5 by William Herschel. He described the western end of the nebula as "Extended; passes thro' 52 Cygni... near 2 degree in length", and described the eastern end as "Branching nebulosity... The following part divides into several streams uniting again towards the south."

When finely resolved, some parts of the image appear to be rope-like filaments. The standard explanation is that the shock waves are so thin, less than one part in 50,000 of the radius,[8] that the shell is visible only when viewed exactly edge-on, giving the shell the appearance of a filament. Undulations in the surface of the shell lead to multiple filamentary images, which appear to be intertwined.

Even though the nebula has a relatively bright integrated magnitude of 7, it is spread over so large an area that the surface brightness is quite low, so the nebula is notorious among astronomers as being difficult to see. However, an observer can see the nebula clearly in a telescope using an OIII filter (a filter isolating the wavelength of light from doubly ionized oxygen), as almost all light from this nebula is emitted at this wavelength. An 8-inch (200 mm) telescope equipped with an OIII filter shows the delicate lacework apparent in photographs, and with an OIII filter almost any telescope could conceivably see this nebula. Some argue that it can be seen without any optical aid except an OIII filter held up to the eye.

The brighter segments of the nebula have the New General Catalog designations NGC 6960, 6974, 6979, 6992, and 6995. The easiest segment to find is 6960, which runs behind the naked eye star 52 Cygni. NGC 6992/5 are also relatively easy objects on the eastern side of the loop. NGC 6974 and NGC 6979 are visible as knots in an area of nebulosity along the northern rim. Pickering's Triangle is much fainter, and has no NGC number (though 6979 is occasionally used to refer to it). It was discovered photographically in 1904 by Williamina Fleming (after the New General Catalogue was published), but credit went to Edward Charles Pickering, the director of her observatory, as was the custom of the day.

18 July 2013

IC 5067 in HaLRGB

Ic 5067 Pelican Nebula

-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 with F/T focuser 3025 & Starizona usb motor focus
-Mount: Skywatcher ΗEQ5 pro & EQ6 Skyscan pro
-Chip: Atik 314L+ at 0c
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 with Meade DSI I pro
-Filter wheel: Starlight Xpress usb 7x1.25
-Location: Manor Obs(Ha) & Agios Panteleimonas (LRGB)
-Luminance: 16x240sec 1x1bin
-Red: 7x240sec 1x1bin
-Green: 7x180sec 1x1bin
-Blue: 7x300sec 1x1bin
-Ha Astrodon 5nm :19x600sec
-Total: 338 minutes (5 hours and 38 min)
-Programs I have used-
Maxim DL ,Pixinsight 1.6, Photoshop CS5, The Sky6 ,Focusmax

The Pelican Nebula (also known as IC 5070 and IC 5067) is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The gaseous contortions of this emission nebula bear a resemblance to a pelican, giving rise to its name. The Pelican Nebula is located nearby first magnitude star Deneb, and is divided from its more prominent neighbour, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust.
The Pelican is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain, and among these are found two jets emitted from the Herbig–Haro object 555. Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different.

07 July 2013

IC 5067 in Ha filter(Astrodon 5nm)

IC 5067 Pelican nebula in Ha
More information about this photo: http://www.astropixel.gr/ha-photography.html

Fits : 19x600sec all 1x1 bin 
From Manor Observatory at Piraeus,Gr

05 July 2013

M 20 Trifid nebula in LRGB


  • Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 mod with FT 3025
  • Camera: Qhy 2pro mono
  • Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 pro
  • Ts finder 8x50 & Meade DSI 1 for guiding
  • Location: Mount.Parnon-Pelloponisos,GR

Information about M 20

The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. Its name means 'divided into three lobes'. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent 'gaps' within the emission nebula that cause the trifid appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers. The Trifid Nebula was the subject of an investigation by astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997, using filters that isolate emission from hydrogen atoms, ionized sulfur atoms, and doubly ionized oxygen atom. The images were combined into a false-color composite picture to suggest how the nebula might look to the eye.

The close-up images show a dense cloud of dust and gas, which is a stellar nursery full of embryonic stars. This cloud is about 8 light-years away from the nebula's central star. A stellar jet protrudes from the head of the cloud and is about 0.75 ly long. The jet's source is a young stellar object deep within the cloud. Jets are the exhaust gasses of star formation. Radiation from the nebula's central star makes the jet glow.

The images also showed a finger-like stalk to the right of the jet. It points from the head of the dense cloud directly toward the star that powers the Trifid nebula. This stalk is a prominent example of evaporating gaseous globules, or 'EGGs'. The stalk has survived because its tip is a knot of gas that is dense enough to resist being eaten away by the powerful radiation from the star.

In January 2005, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered 30 embryonic stars and 120 newborn stars not seen in visible light images.

It is approximately 5,000 ly away from Earth. It is in a magnitude of 6.3.

29 June 2013

NGC 6979 Pickering's Triangle in HaRGB


  • Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 mod with FT 3025
  • Camera: Qhy 2pro mono
  • Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 pro
  • Ts finder 8x50 & Meade DSI 1 for guiding
  • Location: Parnonas mount.Pelloponisos,GR

Information about NGC 6979

The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103), a large but relatively faint supernova remnant. The source supernova exploded some 5,000 to 8,000 years ago, and the remnants have since expanded to cover an area roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, or 36 times the area, of the full moon). The distance to the nebula is not precisely known, but Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) data supports a distance of about 1,470 light-years.

The Hubble Space Telescope captured several images of the nebula. The analysis of the emissions from the nebula indicate the presence of oxygen, sulfur, and hydrogen. This is also one of the largest, brightest features in the x-ray sky. The nebula was discovered on 1784 September 5 by William Herschel. He described the western end of the nebula as "Extended; passes thro' 52 Cygni... near 2 degree in length", and described the eastern end as "Branching nebulosity... The following part divides into several streams uniting again towards the south."

When finely resolved, some parts of the image appear to be rope-like filaments. The standard explanation is that the shock waves are so thin, less than one part in 50,000 of the radius,[8] that the shell is visible only when viewed exactly edge-on, giving the shell the appearance of a filament. Undulations in the surface of the shell lead to multiple filamentary images, which appear to be intertwined.

Even though the nebula has a relatively bright integrated magnitude of 7, it is spread over so large an area that the surface brightness is quite low, so the nebula is notorious among astronomers as being difficult to see. However, an observer can see the nebula clearly in a telescope using an OIII filter (a filter isolating the wavelength of light from doubly ionized oxygen), as almost all light from this nebula is emitted at this wavelength. An 8-inch (200 mm) telescope equipped with an OIII filter shows the delicate lacework apparent in photographs, and with an OIII filter almost any telescope could conceivably see this nebula. Some argue that it can be seen without any optical aid except an OIII filter held up to the eye.

The brighter segments of the nebula have the New General Catalog designations NGC 6960, 6974, 6979, 6992, and 6995. The easiest segment to find is 6960, which runs behind the naked eye star 52 Cygni. NGC 6992/5 are also relatively easy objects on the eastern side of the loop. NGC 6974 and NGC 6979 are visible as knots in an area of nebulosity along the northern rim. Pickering's Triangle is much fainter, and has no NGC number (though 6979 is occasionally used to refer to it). It was discovered photographically in 1904 by Williamina Fleming (after the New General Catalogue was published), but credit went to Edward Charles Pickering, the director of her observatory, as was the custom of the day.

28 June 2013

NGC 281 Pacman nebula in NB


-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 modified
-Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 Skyscan Pro with EQMod & EQDir
-CCD: Qhy2 Pro at -10c
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 & Meade DSI 1
-Ha: 13x600sec 1x1bin
-O3 & S2: 12x600 1x1bin
-Total exposure: 395 minutes
-Location: Manor Observatory, Piraeus,GR



Information about NGC 281

NGC 281 is an H II region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as "a large faint nebula, very diffuse." The multiple star HD 5005, also called \beta1, was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. There has been no appreciable change in this quintuple system since the first measurements were made in 1875.

The nebula is visible in amateur telescopes from dark sky locations. In his book Deep Sky Wonders, Walter Scott Houston describes the appearance of the nebula in small telescopes.

There was a faint glow in the immediate vicinity of the multiple star, with an occasional impression of a much larger nebulosity...Its surface brightness was much less than that of M33 in Triangulum or NGC 205, the distant companion of the Andromeda galaxy.

27 June 2013

NGC 7293 Helix nebula in LRGB


-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 modified
-Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 Skyscan Pro with EQMod & EQDir
-CCD: Qhy2 Pro at -10c
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 & Meade DSI 1
-L: 36x300 bin 1x1
-RGB : 6x300 bin 2x2 all
-Total exposure: -----
-Location: Mountain Parnon Pelloponisos,GR



Information about NGC 7293

The Helix Nebula, also known as The Helix, NGC 7293, is a large planetary nebula (PN) located in the constellation Aquarius. Discovered by Karl Ludwig Harding, probably before 1824, this object is one of the closest to the Earth of all the bright planetary nebulae. The estimated distance is about 215 parsecs or 700 light-years. It is similar in appearance to the Ring Nebula, whose size, age, and physical characteristics are similar to the Dumbbell Nebula, varying only in its relative proximity and the appearance from the equatorial viewing angle.

The Helix Nebula has sometimes been referred to as the "Eye of God" in pop culture.

The Helix Nebula is an example of a planetary nebula, or 'planetary' formed at the end of a star's evolution. Gases from the star in the surrounding space appear, from our vantage point, as if we are looking down a helix structure. The remnant central stellar core, known as a planetary nebula nucleus or PNN, is destined to become a white dwarf star. The observed glow of the central star is so energetic that it causes the previously expelled gases to brightly fluoresce.

The Helix Nebula in the constellation of Aquarius lies about 700 light-years away, spanning about 0.8 parsec or 2.5 light-years. Recent images by the Hubble Space Telescope of the Helix Nebula are a composite of newly released images from the ACS instrument and the wide-angle images from the Mosaic Camera on the WIYN 0.9-metre telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory.

Currently, the age is estimated to be 10,600+2,300 −1,200 years, based solely upon a measured expansion rate of 31 km·s−1

16 June 2013

IC 5146 -Reprocessed old fits-

IC 5146 Cocoon Nebula

  • Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 mod with FT 3025 
  • Camera: Qhy 2pro mono
  • Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 pro
  • Ts finder 8x50 & Meade DSI 1 for guiding
  • Astronomik 6nm Ha : 12x600sec
  • Luminance :  20x180sec
  • Red : 12x180
  • Green : 9x180
  • Blue : 10x180
  • Total exposure : 273 minutes
  • Location: Kithaironas mount.-Attiki,GR


IC 5146 (also Caldwell 19, Sh 2-125, and the Cocoon Nebula) is a reflection/emission nebula and Caldwell object in the constellation Cygnus. IC 5146 refers specifically to the nebula and Collinder 470 to the star cluster.[3] It shines at magnitude +10.0[4]/+9.3[2]/+7.2.[5] Its celestial coordinates are RA 21h 53.5m, dec+47° 16′. It is located near the naked-eye star Pi Cygni, the open cluster NGC 7209 in Lacerta, and the bright open cluster M39.[1][4] The cluster is about 4,000 ly away, and the central star that lights it formed about 100,000 years ago;[6] the nebula is about 12 arcmins across, which is equivalent to a span of 15 light years.[5] When viewing IC 5146, dark nebula Barnard 168 (B168) is an inseparable part of the experience, forming a dark lane that surrounds the cluster and projects westward forming the appearance of a trail behind the Cocoon.

13 June 2013

M 57 The Ring Nebula

M 57 in HaO3LRGB

-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 with F/T focuser 3025 & Starizona usb motor focus
-Mount: Skywatcher ΗEQ5 pro & EQ6 Skyscan pro
-Chip: Atik 314L+ at -5c
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 with Meade DSI I pro
-Filter wheel: Starlight Xpress usb 7x1.25
-Location: Manor Obs(Ha & O3) & Mountain Kithaironas (LRGB)
-Luminance: 24x300sec 1x1bin
-Red: 12x300sec 1x1bin
-Green: 12x240sec 1x1bin
-Blue: 12x300sec 1x1bin

-Ha Astrodon 5nm :15x600sec -  1x1500sec - 4x1200sec
-O3 Astrodon 5nm : 12x300sec
-Total: 10hours and 05 min
-Programs I have used-
Maxim DL ,Pixinsight 1.6, Photoshop CS5, The Sky6 ,Focusmax
 
The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.[5] Such objects are formed when a shell of ionized gas is expelled into the surrounding interstellar medium by a red giant star, which was passing through the last stage in its evolution before becoming a white dwarf.
This nebula was discovered by the French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in January 1779, who reported that it was "...as large as Jupiter and resembles a planet which is fading." Later the same month, fellow French astronomer Charles Messier independently found the same nebula while searching for comets. It was then entered into his catalogue as the 57th object. Messier and German-born astronomer William Herschel speculated that the nebula was formed by multiple faint stars that were unresolvable with his telescope.

04 June 2013

M 57 in Ha (255 minutes)

M 57 Ring Nebula 

Astrodon Ha 5nm : 15x600sec - 1x1500sec - 4x1200sec 
3 June 2013 from Manor Observatory-Piraeus,Greece

24 April 2013

M 106 in LRGB



Messier 106 (also known as NGC 4258) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781. M106 is at a distance of about 22 to 25 million light-years away from Earth. It is also a Seyfert II galaxy, which means that due to x-rays and unusual emission lines detected, it is suspected that part of the galaxy is falling into a supermassive black hole in the center. NGC 4217 is a possible companion galaxy of Messier 106.

12 March 2013

M 78 in LRGB

                             
-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 with F/T focuser 3025 & Starizona usb motor focus
-Mount: Skywatcher ΗEQ5 pro
-Chip: Atik 314L+
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 with Meade DSI I pro
-Filter wheel: Starlight Xpress usb 7x1.25
-Location: Agios Panteleimonas, Attiki,GR (09.03.2013-RGB- & 02.02.2013-LUM-)
-Luminance: 30x300sec 1x1bin
-Red: 6x300sec 1x1bin
-Green: 6x300sec 1x1bin
-Blue: 5x300sec 1x1bin
-Total: 295 min
-Programs I have used-
Maxim DL ,Photoshop CS5, The Sky6 ,Focusmax

The nebula Messier 78 (also known as M 78 or NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year.
M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex and is about 1,600 light years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in small telescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th magnitude. These two stars, HD 38563A and HD 38563B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.

14 February 2013

NGC 7129 in LRGB


-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 with F/T focuser 3025 & Starizona usb motor focus
-Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 Skyscan pro
-Chip: Qhy 2Pro at -10c
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 with Meade DSI I pro
-Filter wheel: Starlight Xpress usb 7x1.25
-Location: Mountain Parnonas, Pelloponisos,GR
-Filters-
Luminance: 37x300sec (bin 1x)
Baader RGB: 10x300sec in all filters (bin 1x)
Total: 335 min

-Programs I have used-
Maxim DL ,Photoshop CS5, The Sky6 ,Focusmax



Information about NGC 7129

NGC 7129 is a reflection nebula located 3,300 light years away in the constellation Cepheus. A young open cluster is responsible for illuminating the surrounding nebula.[2] A recent survey indicates the cluster contains more than 130 stars less than 1 million years old.[citation needed] NGC 7129 is located just half a degree from nearby cluster NGC 7142.

The nebula is rosebud-shaped; the young stars have blown a large, oddly shaped bubble in the molecular cloud that once surrounded them at their birth. The rosy pink color comes from glowing dust grains on the surface of the bubble being heated by the intense light from the young stars within. The ultra-violet and visible light produced by the young stars is absorbed by the surrounding dust grains. They are heated by this process and release the energy at longer infrared wavelengths as photographed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The reddish colors in the false-colour infrared image suggest the distribution of hydrocarbon rich molecular material.[citation needed]

The much cooler molecular cloud outside the bubble is mostly invisible to Spitzer. However, three very young stars near the center of the nebula are sending jets of supersonic gas into the cloud. The collision of these jets heats carbon monoxide molecules in the nebula. This produces the complex nebulosity that appears like a stem of a rosebud.

29 January 2013

IC 434 in HaLRGB


-Telescope: William Optics FLT 110 with F/T focuser 3025 & Starizona usb motor focus
-Mount: Skywatcher EQ6 Skyscan pro
-Chip: Atik 314L+
-Guiding: TS finder 8x50 with Meade DSI I pro
-Filter wheel: Starlight Xpress usb 7x1.25
-Location: Manor Observatory at Piraeus,GR (11/12.01.2013 & 20.01.2012)
-Filters-
Luminance: 60 min (bin 1x)
Baader RGB: 20/20/30 min (bin 1x)
Astrodon Ha(5nm): 225 min (bin 1x)
Total: 355 min

-Programs I have used-
Maxim DL ,Photoshop CS5, The Sky6 ,Focusmax



Information about IC 434

IC 434 is a bright emission nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered on February 1, 1786 by William Herschel.