03 September 2019

Lobster Claw Nebula(Sh2-157)


Sh2-157 in HaRGB

 Sharpless 157, also known as the Lobster Claw Nebula, is a bright emission nebula that lies in the constellation Cassiopeia. It lies just south of the better-known Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635). Within this image of the Lobster Claw are a few other objects. Planetary Nebula PLN 110-0.1 is located near the center of the upper-right quadrant. The bright nebular spot near the center of the image is Lyn's Bright Nebula 537 (LBN537), also known as Sharpless 157a. The small cluster of stars just above the bottom pincer is Markarian 50 and the bright cluster of stars located above the top pincer is open cluster NGC 7510.

Telescope : TS 65Q apo
Mount : Skywatcher AZ-EQ5 GT
Camera : Atik 460 Exm
Guiding : Off-axis with Meade DSI 2
Filters : Astrodon Ha 5nm (29x900sec) all 1x1bin
             RGB Baader (12x300sec) all 1x1bin
Total exposure : 10 hours and 15 minutes from 2 different nights at Grammatiko,Attiki,GR


09 July 2019

North America &Pelican Nebula Mosaic


Mosaic 3x3 (9 panels) in Ha filter with Atik 460Exm 
Telescope : TS 65Q
Camera : Atik 460EXm
Guider : Off-axis with Meade DSI 2
Mount : Skywatcher AZ-EQ5 GT
Grammatiko,Attiki/GR
Total Time : 12 hours in 4 nights

29 June 2019

NGC 7822 in LHaO3RGB combination


NGC 7822 L(HaO3)RGB 
Telescope : TS 65Q
Camera : Atik 460EXm
Guider : Off-axis with Meade DSI 2
Mount : Skywatcher AZ-EQ5 GT
Grammatiko,Attiki/GR

NGC 7822 is a young star forming complex in the constellation of Cepheus. The complex encompasses the emission region designated Sharpless 171, and the young cluster of stars named Berkeley 59. The complex is believed to be some 800–1000 pc distant, with the younger components aged no more than a few million years. The complex also includes one of the hottest stars discovered within 1 kpc of the Sun, namely BD+66 1673, which is an eclipsing binary system consisting of an O5V that exhibits a surface temperature of nearly 45,000 K and a luminosity about 100,000 times that of the Sun. The star is one of the primary sources illuminating the nebula and shaping the complex's famed pillars of creation-type formations, the elephant trunks.

26 June 2019

Markarian Chain in LRGB


Markarian Chain LRGB 
from Grammatiko,Attiki,GR
Telescope : TS 65Q
CCD : Atik 460EXM
Guiding : off axis and Meade DSI 2
 
Markarian's Chain is a stretch of galaxies that forms part of the Virgo Cluster. When viewed from Earth, the galaxies lie along a smoothly curved line. Charles Messier first discovered two of the galaxies, M84 and M86, in 1781. The other galaxies seen in the chain were discovered by William Herschel and are now known primarily by their catalog numbers in John Louis Emil Dreyer's New General Catalogue, published in 1888. It was ultimately named after the Armenian astrophysicist, Benjamin Markarian, who discovered their common motion in the early 1960s. Member galaxies include M84 (NGC 4374), M86 (NGC 4406), NGC 4477, NGC 4473, NGC 4461, NGC 4458, NGC 4438 and NGC 4435. It is located at RA 12h 27m and Dec +13° 10′.
The bright members of the chain are visible through small telescopes. Larger telescopes can be used to view the fainter galaxies.
At least seven galaxies in the chain appear to move coherently, although others appear to be superposed by chance. Six of the points on the chain can be marked by galaxies. The other two points are pairs of galaxies.

from wikipedia

M 33 in LRGB


 M 33 LRGB
from Grammatiko,Attiki,GR
Telescope : TS 65Q
CCD : Atik 460EXM
Guiding : off axis and Meade DSI 2
 

Startrails from Agia Triada Grammatiko


Trails form Agia Triada Grammatiko,Attiki,GR 
with Nikon D5100 with Samyang 12mm

IC 1396 Hubble pallette

 IC 1396 in narrowband
from Grammatiko,Attiki,GR

Telescope : TS 65Q
CCD : Atik 460EXM
Guiding : off axis and Meade DSI 2